Current News

Keeping you up-to-date with information from around the country: highlighting news about corruption; drawing attention to statistics and perceptions; and pointing out the activities of our watch-dog bodies.

Dropped charges confirm Guptagate scapegoating

The South African National Defence Force’s recent withdrawing of charges against the two officers that it implicated in the investigation into the so-called Guptagate scandal in 2013, confirms that they were chosen as scapegoats, said Corruption Watch in a statement released today.

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ConCourt rules for DA in Nkandla SMS saga

The Constitutional Court has ruled in favour of the DA in the matter of a contentious SMS sent to Gauteng voters just before national elections in May last year. The ruling has been widely welcomed as a win for freedom of expression, but some do not see it as a victory at all.

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No more secret party funding, says MVC

My Vote Counts is heading to the Constitutional Court next month, to challenge what it views as a deficiency in the electoral system. MVC says that voters need to know about the private funding of all political parties in order to make better informed choices - the NGO will ask the court to direct Parliament to urgently pass legislation that will ensure this disclosure.

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Hawks saga - feathers continue to fly

Suspensions; notices of suspension; court battles; and speculation over political interference. These are some of the scenarios that have preoccupied the leadership of the priority crime fighting unit, the Hawks, over the past few weeks.

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Global corruption snapshots: 15 January 2015

Launched on 13 January, Afrileaks hopes to safely connect whistle-blowers with investigative journalists. Singaporean prime minister Lee Hsien Loong says his government will take steps to ensure that the public service is free of corruption and actively combating it. German company Rheinmetall has admitted to paying a 127-million-euro bribe to Greek officials to secure the sale of 353 Leopard 2 battle tanks in a deal that was completed in 2009. Read the latest corruption stories from around the world.

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CW reporter profile relatively unchanged

Although our data shows that there are some characteristics that are seen more than others, our latest reporter study confirms that our reporters come from all provinces, various sectors of business, and from all walks of life, and they range in age from under 20 to over 60. This is what we would like to see even more of in 2015 – so keep those reports coming in!

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Make your mark in 2015 by supporting a good cause!

Citizen activism organisation Lead SA has named Corruption Watch as one of its 15 causes to support in 2015, along with the likes of WWF SA, Habitat for Humanity, and the Treatment Action Campaign. They are singled out because Lead SA feels their success will make the biggest positive impact on our society. Supporting any one of these worthy causes is as easy as clicking on a link!

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SA among top developing countries with illicit outflows

A recent report shows that South Africa is among the top countries in the world in terms of illicit financial outflows. Millions of rands are moved illegally across the country’s borders every year, and it loses an average of $12.2-million a year, or about R142-million at today’s exchange rate, to these illegal activities.

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Corruption and the wildlife trade

Corruption is a huge threat to the safety of our fauna, as it facilitates illegal trade in animal parts, especially sought-after items such as elephant ivory and rhino horns, writes Mark Jones, a veterinarian who is currently programmes manager for wildlife at the UK’s Born Free Foundation.

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The good and bad news

Although South Africa maintained a stable score on the recent Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index, this is not as encouraging as it seems, writes David Lewis. Those satisfied with mediocrity must remember that our ranking has dropped by about 30 places in the past six or seven years.

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