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Shooting the messenger: standard practice for corrupt governments

Image: Freepik image generator Source: Transparency International As Transparency International’s official chapter in South Africa, Corruption Watch keeps a keen eye on the activities of our fellow chapters around the world. When those chapters are baselessly attacked for doing their work, it resonates with us because we, too, have experienced this unpleasantness. It’s something anti-corruption Read more >

2023 CPI: SA continues downward trajectory on corruption

Anti-corruption movement Transparency International (TI) today released the 2023 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), which paints a bleak picture of South Africa’s progress. Dropping below the global average, the country has lost a further two points since last year on the leading global index measuring perceptions of public sector corruption around the world. Since Corruption Watch Read more >

2023 Corruption Perceptions Index to be launched on 30 January 2024

South Africa’s score in relation to perceptions of tackling corruption in the country over the past year will once again be in the spotlight when global anti-corruption movement Transparency International releases its renowned annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) on Tuesday, 30 January 2024. The CPI is the leading global indicator of public sector corruption, providing Read more >

SA slides further down 2022 CPI as global anti-corruption flounders

The release today of global anti-corruption movement Transparency International’s (TI) 2022 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) is a discouraging story, as South Africa slips one point in the rankings of the leading global index measuring perceptions of public sector corruption around the world. South Africa has barely shifted position on the CPI over the 11 years Read more >

2022 Corruption Perceptions Index to be launched on 31 January 2023

South Africa’s ranking in relation to global perceptions of corruption will be among the headlines when global anti-corruption movement Transparency International releases its annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) on Tuesday, 31 January 2023. This year’s theme is Conflict, peace and security. Each year, the CPI scores 180 countries and territories around the world based on Read more >

Solutions abound to SA’s graft problem – political will, not so much

By Karam Singh and Tharin Pillay First published on News24 Corruption Watch opened its doors 10 years ago on 26 January, to a warm reception from the media and government alike. The organisation’s primary aim is to facilitate public participation by providing citizens with a platform where they can report experiences of corruption.  On this front, we have Read more >

2021 CPI: SA again fails to progress in anti-corruption efforts

Today’s release of Transparency International’s 2021 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) reveals that South Africa, along with many other countries in the world, has reached a virtual standstill in its efforts to curb corruption, as human rights abuses and the erosion of democracy flourish. The CPI, the leading global indicator of public sector corruption, ranks 180 Read more >

Another year, another CPI – and it’s the same old story

Image: Flickr/dirkb86 There’s not much to say about South Africa’s showing in this year’s Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), released today by Transparency International (TI). We’ve said it all before in recent years, because South Africa has produced yet another mediocre score – one that has not changed by more than three points in the last Read more >

MEDIA ADVISORY: 2021 Corruption Perception Index to be released on 25 January 2022

Perceptions of corruption in South Africa will be under the spotlight again on Tuesday, 25 January 2022, when Transparency International, the leading civil society organisation tackling corruption worldwide, releases its annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI). The CPI ranks 180 countries by their perceived levels of public sector corruption, drawing on 13 surveys covering expert assessments Read more >