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Corruption: Africa’s undeclared but deadly pandemic

By Tafi Mhaka First published on Al Jazeera On June 21, Malawi’s President Lazarus Chakwera fired the country’s chief of police, suspended several senior government officials and also took the extraordinary step of stripping his deputy, Saulos Chilima, of all powers after they were accused of receiving kickbacks from UK-based businessman Zuneth Sattar in exchange Read more >

African TI chapters urge AU to uphold its anti-corruption commitments

To mark African Anti-Corruption Day, held every year on 11 July, Transparency International’s (TI) 28 chapters across the African continent have written an open letter to the African Union (AU), reminding it of its anti-corruption commitments and urging it to accelerate action against the effects and perpetrators of corruption. The theme of this year’s event Read more >

Implementing and Enforcing the AUCPCC: a comparative review

Transparency International’s (TI) new report, titled Implementing and Enforcing the African Union Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption: a Comparative Review, examines 10 African states in terms of the state of implementation of the AUCPCC. They are Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Ghana, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Tunisia. Read more >

Corruption doesn’t have a colour

By Adjoa Adjei-TwumFirst published on Modern Ghana Africa has always been perceived by western nations as a corrupt continent, with almost all the international organisations and rating agencies rating the continent as high risk. But the truth is that corruption has always existed in different forms and is not determined by politics or geography. It Read more >

Africa can clamp down on illicit flows by using AUCPCC effectively

By Sabeehah Motala Illicit financial flows (IFFs) are costing Africa $30-billion to $40-billion per year and have eroded African countries’ tax bases, hampering their abilities to respond effectively to Covid-19 emergency needs. Lockdown, states of emergency, and all the accompanying implications mean that developing states are more vulnerable than ever to the possibility of illicit Read more >