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The rationale for fighting corruption

The cost of corruption is much higher than would seem at first glance. If you want to understand why Corruption Watch, Transparency International, and all the other organisations fighting corruption do what they do, read this brief prepared by the OECD’s CleanGovBiz initiative. The costs of corruption for economic, political and social development are becoming Read more >

Investigator’s testimony fingers Zuma, Shaik

By Lee-Ann Alfreds President Jacob Zuma received “financial benefit” from the arms deal. And there was “prima facie” evidence of corruption involving the president and related to the deal, the Arms Procurement Commission heard last month. Testifying on 18 and 19 May before the enquiry which is investigating allegations of fraud and corruption in South Read more >

AG: municipal supply chain management problematic

Municipal employees, councillors, their relatives and broader public servants benefited from municipality contracts worth over R800-million between 2013 and 2014. This was revealed by auditor-general Kimi Makwetu in his latest local government audit report released on Wednesday. Of the amount, the biggest chunk – R781-million – went to close relatives of employees and councillors. The Read more >

CW weighs in on draft FIC amendment bill

Corruption Watch has made submissions on the draft Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) amendment bill. The treasury published the bill on 21 April, and invited public comment until 31 May. The bill was approved by Cabinet on 15 April. “We are generally impressed by the commitment by the National Treasury and FIC to deal with the Read more >

Open data is a key factor in fighting corruption

An open, democratic government system that gives its citizens access to information on its plans, its spending patterns and its services – it's the ideal that the world’s open data advocates work towards daily, for the nations that need it. Whether or not they will win the war against administrative secrecy remains to be seen, Read more >

Madonsela responds to Nhleko’s Nkandla report

Source: Public Protector The public protector, Advocate Thuli Madonsela, notes police minister Nathi Nhleko’s report to Parliament on the security upgrades at President Jacob Zuma’s private residence in Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal. She is of the view that Minister Nhleko gave the matter his best and that he applied his mind to the issues at hand. The Read more >

Zuma doesn’t have to pay back the money

President Zuma has been exonerated by Police Minister Nathi Nhleko, who briefed the media on his Nkandla report. Image source: GCIS Police Minister Nathi Nhleko yesterday gave his report-back on the Nkandla upgrades. At a press briefing punctuated by educational videos on the use and meaning of various features at Nkandla, Nhleko revealed his conclusion: Read more >

Namibian president voluntarily declares assets

South Africa is a country where assets and business interests, including that of government officials, can be a murky, secretive matter. But our north-western neighbour Namibia is showing how it's done – newly appointed president Hage Geingob and his wife Monica have both voluntarily made disclosures of their assets and business interests. This, says Rick Read more >

Madonsela clarifies confusion over her office’s powers

Source: Office of the Public Protector Public Protector Thuli Madonsela has attributed the ongoing confusion on the powers of her office to the tendency to delink the office from other independent institutions established under chapter nine of the Constitution and the fact that the Public Protector Act is not in line with the Constitution. Addressing Read more >